Tuesday, 29 November 2011

Volume Week 6 W/O2

Heavy legs and some pressing vertically.

Warm Up (5 minutes)
Main (20 minutes).
1. Pistols (20kg assistance/64kg working weight: 8, 8, 8)
2i. (Slow Lower) Dumbell Press (17.5kg x 2 x 8)
2ii. HSPU (lowers)
3. Golfers Elbow Drumstick Rotation (12)
4. 5-Way DB Rotator Cuff (10)
5. Reverse DB Wrist Curls (12)

Sunday, 27 November 2011

Volume Week 6 W/O1

A big storm blew through here last night.  This morning we have blue skies and a fresh breeze - just what you need for workout!

Week six see me trying to push it, but this will be my last week on this particular cycle.  I know that training will be a bit disjointed during December, so things might get a but haphazard.  I will certainly take some time to simply rest up over the next month.

Warm Up (5 minutes)
Main (30 minutes).
1. Stairgators (1)
2. Barefoot Sprinting (1x10s, 1x10s, 1x10s, 1x10s, 1x10s)
3. MU to Ring Routine (4, 4, 4)
4a. Scissor Splits (3x '2L, 2R, 2C')
4b. Planche Variations (20s, 20s, 20s)
5. Barefoot Kill Carry (1)
6. 321 (8L, 8L, 8M)


Friday, 25 November 2011

Krebs / Citric Acid Cycle

Courtesy of KhanAcademy:

Volume Week 5 W/O3

Continuing with the DGSS idea, here are my alternatives:

Warm Up (15 minutes)
Main (25 minutes).
1a. Snatch Grip Deadlift off a Deficit (5x5xBW)
1b. Weighted Chins (3x6xBW+25kg - 1 min rest btw)
2. Backbridge, Wall Walk (15s, 2)
3. Headstand Reverse Leg Lift (5, 5, 5)
4. 321 (x/8L, x/8L, x/8M)

Neuron Transplant Cures Obesity

From New Scientist: Neuron transplant in damaged brain fixes obesity (in mice),
  • Jeffrey Macklis at Harvard University and his colleagues took healthy neurons from mouse embryos that had been labelled with a green fluorescent protein. They used them to repair a brain circuit involved in the regulation of food intake and body weight in response to a hormone called leptin in mutant mice born with damage to that area, which become dangerously overweight as a result.

    The fluorescent neurons survived the transplant, integrated into the brain circuit, and differentiated into mature neurons that could communicate with existing neurons and respond to leptin, insulin and glucose – suggesting that they had repaired the damaged circuit. The treated obese mice went on to weigh 30 per cent less than their untreated counterparts.
I'm not sure if 'conventional human obesity' results from damage to the brain circuit involved in the regulation of food intake, but interesting nonetheless.

Tuesday, 22 November 2011

Volume Week 5 W/O2

Some more alternatives exercises for week five:

Warm Up (5 minutes)
Main (20 minutes).
1. Seated Leg Press  (240 x 8, 8, 8)
2. Handwalking (1, 1, 1)
3. Golfers Elbow Drumstick Rotation (12)
4. 5-Way DB Rotator Cuff (10)
5. Wrist Push Ups (12)

Sunday, 20 November 2011

Volume Week 5 W/O1

Different gear, still speeding! I am still trying to go max but am selecting some alternative exercises which tax same/similar muscles (although I am not really sure what my maxes will be for some of these new moves):

Warm Up (5 minutes)
Main (30 minutes).
1. Stairgators (1)
2. Weighted Barefoot Sprinting (1x10s, 1x10s, 1x10s, 1x10s)
3. Rope Climb (3, 3, 3)
4a. Scissor Splits (3x '2L, 2R, 2C')
4b. Planche Variations (30s, 30s)
5. Weighted Barefoot Kill Carry (1)
6. Hangboarding (10 min Intermediate)

Friday, 18 November 2011

Avoid Aging

Aubrey de Grey has been on the scene for a while.  I first came across him in an article in The Guardian several years ago.  He has very thought provoking ideas.  On this TED Talk he discusses some of these ideas:
  • Cambridge researcher Aubrey de Grey argues that aging is merely a disease -- and a curable one at that. Humans age in seven basic ways, he says, all of which can be averted.

Mastering Maths

Knowledge is power.  Maths is the one universal language, yet perhaps the one we fear most.  Get yourself to Khanacademy for some excellent mathematics tutorials.
  • With a library of over 2,700 videos covering everything from arithmetic to physics, finance, and history and 240 practice exercises, we're on a mission to help you learn what you want, when you want, at your own pace.
Salman Khan at TED talking about using video to reinvent education.

Volume Week 4 W/O3

When it comes to training I am not feeling 'top dollar' today. I feel this is part of the cycle of human behaviour - sometimes I am up, sometimes down - nothing to worry about.  Of course motivation waxes and wanes.  We'll see how it pans out in the workout below.

Next week I am going to change up all exercises for a week (week 5), and then plan to revert to my regular workout for week six.  After which, I will deload and start a training cycle once again.  This variation should prove reinvigorating.

My last session of 321s lead to a fatigue-induced shortfall in reps and sets so I am going to rest the fingers today.  God knows the DLs give your grip a workout of sorts anyway!

Warm Up (15 minutes)
Main (25 minutes).
1a. Deadlift (5/4x145, 6/5x130)
1b. OACs (3X55/50kg, 4X50/45, 2-arm 10xBW with Straight-Leg Leg-Lift)
2. Backbridge, Wall Walk (15s, 2)
3. 321 (x/8L, x/8L, x/8M)

Tuesday, 15 November 2011

The Food Hospital: Making the Horse Push

Why make a horse pull a cart when you can stick it at the back and make it push?  This is the metaphorical equivalent of what is happening on The Food Hospital.  After rant one and rant two, here is rant three.

Unhappy with entertaining the idea that some consumer items masquerading as food can lead to malady, they assume that pretty much everything sold to us as food IS food, and that people who are sick (sickness that could NOT possibly come from poor nutritional choices), can seek remedy in the medicinal qualities of food.

Baise Moi!

Volume Week 4 W/O2

Another day of heavy legs and some pressing vertically...

Warm Up (5 minutes)
Main (20 minutes).
1. Pistols (20kg assistance/64kg working weight: 5, 6, 7)
2i. Alternate Arm MBTs(5kg 8)
2ii. (Slow Lower) Dumbell Press (17kg x 8)
2iii. HSPU (unassisted 0/1)
3. Golfers Elbow Drumstick Rotation (12)
4. 5-Way DB Rotator Cuff (10)
5. Reverse DB Wrist Curls (12)

Sunday, 13 November 2011

Volume Week 4 W/O1

It is dull, grey, damp and misty outside. Not the most inviting conditions for a workout...!

Warm Up (5 minutes)
Main (30 minutes).
1. Stairgators (1)
2. Barefoot Sprinting (1x10s, 1x10s, 1x10s, 1x10s, 1x10s)
3. MU to Ring Routine (4, 4, 4)
4a. Scissor Splits (3x '2L, 2R, 2C')
4b. Planche Variations (20s, 20s, 20s)
5. Barefoot Kill Carry (1)
6. 321 (8/8L, 5/8L, 0/8M)

Friday, 11 November 2011

Volume Week 3 W/O3

After today I will see if I want to cut back next week or keep pushing.  I am wary of injury - particularly when things are going well.  If I do push on for another week or two, I have come across a means of increasing serum testosterone - which in some cases has led to an increase 147% above baseline over the course of a week.

Full cookies (pun intended)!

Warm Up (15 minutes)
Main (25 minutes).
1a. Deadlift (4x145, 5x130)
1b. OACs (5/4x50kg, 6/5x45, 2-arm 10xBW with Straight-Leg Leg Lift)
2. Backbridge, Wall Walk (15s, 2)
3. 321 (x/8L, x/8L, x/8M)

Thursday, 10 November 2011

A Recipe for Confusion

So how do you confuse people in the area of diet and nutrition?  Try this;
  1. Come up with a blanket recommendation such as Reduce your salt intake - and get your government/NGOs on board:
    "The government has set a target of reducing the average salt consumption of adults to 6g per day by 2010. This is a challenging but achievable goal, which will bring measurable improvements in health. A study published in the scientific journal Hypertension in 2003 estimated that a reduction in salt intake to 6g per day would lead to a 13 per cent reduction in stroke and a 10 per cent reduction in ischaemic heart disease. "
  2. Find an association or organisation that is likely to back a contrary view for 'balance' - so in this case we'd go with the European Salt Producers Association.
  3. Broadcast research that detracts from the message in step one. 'Low Salt Diet May Increase the Likelihood of Heart Disease'.
  4. Follow the money.  Find a link between the researcher in step three and the association in step two.
Here's the thing - don't eat anything with 'hidden salt' as it is unlikely to be 'food'; food-like maybe.  In fact don't eat anything in which contains 'additives' that could be considered 'hidden'.  Don't eat stuff that would require any kind of 'food labelling'.  What is hidden in a carrot?  Nothing.  Everything in a carrot makes a carrot a carrot.  Capiche? 

A naive approach?  Probably.  A simplistic approach?  Yes - as should be your approach to food.

KISS.

Tuesday, 8 November 2011

The Food Hospital: Still Shovelling It

Following on from last week's (ranting) review of The Food Hospital, allow me to present a ranting review of episode two.

The program itself is a great concept - exploring as it does, the relationship between a wide variety of illness and disease, and food.  But as usual in these cases, they get it 'arse about face'.  As I said last week, it is not that food is medicine, it is more the case that if you look at things from an evolutionary perspective, what you see is people who have poisoned themselves through malnutrition.

So once again the advice boiled down to a 'balanced diet' that again I'd summarise as:
  • 'Eat low fat foods, avoid saturated fat, not much meat, and plenty of fruit,vegetables and wholegrains'
We also got advise to eat several smaller meals - not forgetting to ensure we eat breakfast.  Again you have to wonder what they hell they think our fat stores are for!  We should be able to switch over to fat-burning (or rather ramp-up our fat burning), without a big palava outside of eating.  The producers really should read up on 'metabolic flexibility' - and perhaps intermittent fasting whilst they are at it.

If idea of fasting makes you dread the ensuing hunger, your are NOT metabolically flexible.  Fasting should be painless and if it isn't, you should be worried because you are eating the wrong foods, eating too frequently or both.

What was interesting about this program was the range of disease and illness that could be resolved by a dietary intervention.  There was talk about O6 and inflammation along with ailments as wide ranging as acid reflux, alopecia and rampant psoriasis.

Sadly use of supplements in the course of the show will feed preconceptions about a pill to fix things - when the fish oil could have been subtituted by fish and the probiotics replaced by yoghurt.

The BIG thing they miss in this program is the chance to show us what people are eating to make them so sick in the first place.  It is all very well showing folk what they SHOULD eat, but if you can actually show them that the stuff they are eating RIGHT NOW, the stuff that tastes SO DAMN GOOD, is what has lead to these ailments, then maybe you'd get more of a response.

Unfortunately we  just get pretty much the same old crap.... 

Remember guys, when flogging a dead horse, first whip harder, then change the whip, then change the rider. Finally get off and push the dead horse. Eventually the dead horse will move....I just know it.

TV rant number two over. Baise moi.

Aside:  I've add in a picture of my regular 'fucking awesome monster meal'.  I hope you can see the size of this bad boy - it has to have its own super-sized plate which is a few inches in diameter bigger than that used to host The Doctor.  What you can't really see is the amount of butter.  Eat less do more?  I don't think so! 

Also I've just noted that this is my fifth year 'paleo'.

Volume Week 3 W/O2

Again I'm going to keep the variety in the shoulder work (MBTs and HSPU variations).

Warm Up (5 minutes)
Main (20 minutes).
1. Pistols (28kg assistance/56kg working weight: 8, 8, 8)
2i. MBTs(5kg 8)
2ii. HSPU (assisted 10)
2iii. HSPU (unassisted 1)
3. Golfers Elbow Drumstick Rotation (12)
4. 5-Way DB Rotator Cuff (10)
5. Reverse DB Wrist Curls (12)

Monday, 7 November 2011

We Are Baysian Inference Machines


Daniel Wolpert: The real reason for brains,
  • Neuroscientist Daniel Wolpert starts from a surprising premise: the brain evolved, not to think or feel, but to control movement. In this entertaining, data-rich talk he gives us a glimpse into how the brain creates the grace and agility of human motion.
Why do we and other animals have brains, what is the brain for? To perceive the world or to think? No - well not according to Daniel Wolpert. Wolpert claims that we have a brain for one reason - to produce adaptable and complex movements.

Yep, the brain has evolved to control movement.  Movement is the only way we have of affecting the world around us (apart form sweating). Everything else involves a contraction of muscles, from speech and sign language to sensory feedback...they're all due to muscle movement!

Wolpert makes the case that unlike a game of chess where IBM's Big Blue will beat most players by processing a finite set of outcomes for each and every given move, making a robot physically move a chess piece is way more difficult as the movement itself has an almost infinite complexity such that the dexterity of a 5 year old is far superior to that of the latest robot.

Unlike the mental part of a chess game which succumbs to a generalised algorithm, the phyiscal act of manipulating pieces on a chess board cannot be reduced to a simple algorithm controlling movement - roboticists cannot generalise from one task to another.

Movement is medicine.  It's all about the feedback. 

Like!  :)

Sunday, 6 November 2011

Volume Week 3 W/O1

Off the leash!

Warm Up (5 minutes)
Main (30 minutes).
1. Stairgators (1)
2. Barefoot Sprinting (1x10s, 1x10s, 1x10s, 1x10s, 1x10s)
3. MU to Ring Routine (4, 4, 4)
4a. Scissor Splits (3x '2L, 2R, 2C')
4b. Planche Variations (20s, 20s, 20s)
5. Barefoot Kill Carry (1)
6. 321 (8/8L, 8/8L, 8/8M)

Friday, 4 November 2011

Volume Week 2 W/O3

Deloaded to about 90%.

Warm Up (5 minutes)
Main (25 minutes).
1a. Deadlift (4x130, 5x120)
1b. OACs (4x49kg, 5x44, 2-arm 10xBW)
2. Wall Walk (2, 2)
3. 321 (8/8L, 8/8L, 5/8M)

Dilbert

Dilbert.com

Thursday, 3 November 2011

Cavemen Do It on the Hoof!

They just need to add in the concept of fasted training and 'eating close to the ground' and then they'll get there! 

Less is more when learning 'The Once and Future Way to Run':

  • "...humans had thrived as running animals for two million years without corrective shoes, and asphalt was no harder than the traditional hunting terrains of the African savanna."

Tuesday, 1 November 2011

The Food Hospital: Bag O'Crap

Well the Food Hospital did fulfill my expectations.  It really was rubbish - not because the 'remedies' failed, they worked, and in some cases fantastically, but because the whole premise that food is medicine is wrong.

We are NOT born sick.  We have not evolved to be in some way faulty. We did not evolve in a permanent state of hunger.  Yet these are the subtexts of The Food Hospital; that food can fix you:
  • medicine /med·i·cine/ (med´ĭ-sin) 1. any drug or remedy.2. the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.3. the treatment of disease by nonsurgical means.

So people turn up to the Food Hospital with various illnesses and maladies.  But if you look at things from an evolutionary perspective, what you see is people who have poisoned themselves through malnutrition:
  • poison [poi′zən] any substance that impairs health or destroys life when ingested, inhaled, or absorbed by the body in relatively small amounts. Some toxicologists suggest that, depending on the dose, all substances are poisons. Many experts state that it is impossible to categorize any chemical as either safe or toxic and that the real concern is the risk or hazard associated with the use of any substance. Clinically all poisons are divided into those that respond to specific treatments or antidotes and those for which there is no specific treatment. Research continues to develop effective antitoxins for poisons, but there are relatively few effective antidotes. Maintaining respiration and circulation is the most important aspect of treatment. See also poisoning treatment. poisonous, adj.
To a man, the bad teeth on display would have given anyone familiar with the work of Weston A Price enough of a signal as to what was at the root of most patients ill health.  When I say 'to a man' I also include the bearded woman whose insulin insensitivity was suspected of being behind her high testosterone (about 5 times higher than normal).

As for the obese guy who snacked his way through 5000 calories of garage food a day, he was required to lose about 20% of his bodyweight to get his T2 in to remission.  So they put him on some protein drink, allowing him 800 calories a day.  Sure he lost weight.  Is it sustainable?  Nope.  Will his metabolism readjust?  Probably.  Is he losing fat and muscle mass?  Probably.  Is this a good thing?  Erm .....errrr.....well he is losing weight I guess....

You just have to wonder what the hell goes through the heads of these doctors.  How the hell did we survive the past two million years without processed foods and shakes?  Do they really think that chronic hunger and a relentless life of activity kept us lean?  What turns hunger on or off?  What role does hunger have in making every other species participate in demanding physical activity?  Is calorie restriction really a good idea when it comes to changing ones dietary lifestyle?  Historically, where did we get vitamins from?  If you have to fortify food to make it nutritious - is it appropriate to regard it as food?

But what really bugged me was the advice given out which could be broadly summarised as,
  • 'Eat low fat foods, avoid saturated fat, not much meat, and plenty of fruit,vegetables and wholegrains'

Yes my friends - as you can see above, the advice of WHAT to eat has not changed much since the 1970s. That is not to say the REASON to eat as prescribed above hasn't changed.  Indeed there was plenty of talk of insulin sensitivity, hormonal maladjustment and so forth, but sadly the failed dietary prescription of the past 40 years will somehow now work in 2011 because the reasoning behind WHY IT SHOULD WORK has changed.
Remember guys, when flogging a dead horse, first whip harder, then change the whip, then change the rider.  Finally get off and push the dead horse.  Eventually the dead horse will move....I just know it.
TV rant over.  Baise moi.

Volume Week 2 W/O2

We did a lot of air squatting and kick work at Lau Gar last night (including jumping kicks), so my legs are a bit torched today. Auto adjust.

I'm going to keep the variety in the shoulder work (MBTs and HSPU variations).

Warm Up (5 minutes)
Main (20 minutes).
1. Pistols (35kg assistance: 8, 8, 8)
2i. MBTs(5kg 8)
2ii. HSPU (assisted 10)
2iii. HSPU (unassisted 1)
3. Golfers Elbow Drumstick Rotation (12)
4. 5-Way DB Rotator Cuff (10)
5. Reverse DB Wrist Curls (12)